Move LifeStyle

Move LifeStyle

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Do YOU Know Where Your Vagina Is? Why Sex Education is Crucial for our Kids

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Matisse Image Via: ArtFund.org

Growing up, my sister and I never used alternate term in lieu of “vagina.” I remember several of my girlfriends having little nicknames they used, which I always found odd. I have never understood the practice of referring to body parts by using what is thought to be a more innocuous term. Why not just call them what they are?

As a mother, I see many of my peers reaching out for guidance as their children become toddlers and pre-schoolers, begging for advice on Facebook on what to teach their children to call their body parts. Recently, in a public restroom while shopping, I overheard a mother tell her daughter to “wipe her cookie.” I was appalled. A “cookie?”
If we as women can’t respect our bodies, use proper anatomical terminology, and be proud of the incredible machines they are, how can we possibly teach our daughters to demand the same respect when it comes to protecting and nurturing their own bodies?

The Daily Dot recently published an article titled “Women on the Internet Don’t Know Where the Vagina Is.” Cited within are several threads and posts from young women asking for help in locating their vagina. Also shared was a poll in the UK that showed only 50% of women between the ages of 26-35 could properly identify the vagina on a diagram.

The importance of sex education is crucial. No matter your beliefs, religious or otherwise, the most important thing we can do is to educate our children on this topic ourselves. Use the anatomical terms when referring to body parts. Eliminate the confusion. Growing up and learning these things can be daunting for kids, so we should aim to lessen the ambiguity with straight talk. We need to show our children the importance and power of such knowledge, and it should begin at home. Give them the tools to understand their bodies, the act of sex, how conception occurs. Knowing the proper names will empower children, and is one of the top recommendations among professionals working to prevent child sexual abuse.Talk to Your Kids About their Bodies | Move LifeStyle

Don’t rely on the school system to teach comprehensive sex education. Talk to your children about their bodies. Look them in the eyes, let them ask questions. Empower them. If we as parents take the topic seriously, our children will, too.

How did you feel about your early sex education? If you’d like to, please share in the comments below.

Author Description

Ashley Fauset

Ashley is a party planner, grammar enthusiast, classically trained dancer, and coffee aficionado. She lives in Los Angeles with her musician husband and their hammy four-year-old, and shares her tales of mama-hood at Silver Lake Mom. You can find her online on Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram


Move LifeStyle is an e-zine for the modern working woman created by Autumn Reeser, Jenn Wong and Ashley Fauset.

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